Dead Sea Salt

What is Dead Sea Salt

Dead Sea Salt, rich in minerals and gathered from the Dead Sea, the saline levels are approximately 33% which is near about 10 times substantially more potent than usual sea water as it is at a mere 3.5%.

The chemical compounds found in The dead sea salt are very particular that separates it from all other's, with only 10% sodium and very high concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, bromide and zinc plus many more. The minerals manifest naturally in the human body and are detrimental to your health as the mineral count diminish from the body. Dead sea salt replenishes the mineral count to your Body.

Top 12 Cosmetic Benefits of Dead Sea Salt

  • itching
  • Sores
  • Rashes
  • Acne
  • Psoriasis
  • Eczema
  • Dandruff
  • Seborrhea
  • Scabies
  • Hair Loss
  • Cellulite
  • Water Retention

Where Does Dead Sea Salt Come From

Earth's Lowest elevation on land. The Asphaltite lake in Greek is the Largest Salt Lake in the world, 300 or so meters deep, the surface shores are 430 meters below sea level. 

The Dead Sea is 50 kilometres long and 15 kilometres wide at its widest point.

 Joining from the Jordan river, the Density of the Dead sea water is of 1.24 kg/litre which makes it easy to float on. Due to Dead Sea receding there is a project starting 2018 using Brine from the red sea to stabilize its levels.

 The Dead Sea area has become a location for health research and potential treatment for a number of reasons.

  • The mineral content of the water 

  • The low content of pollens and other allergens in the atmosphere

  • The reduced  ultraviolet component of solar radiation 

  • The higher atmospheric pressure at this great depth each may have specific health effects

For example, Human Beings experiencing reduced respiratory function from diseases such as cystic fibrosis seem to benefit from the elevated atmospheric pressure.

 

 The region's climate and low elevation have made it a popular center for assessment of putative therapies.

Climatotherapy: Treatment which exploits local climatic features such as temperature, humidity, sunshine, barometric pressure and special atmospheric constituents Heliotherapy: Treatment that exploits the biological effects of the sun's radiation.

Thalassotherapy: Treatment that exploits bathing in Dead Sea water.

Psoriasis Climatotherapy at the Dead Sea may be a therapy for psoriasis by sunbathing for long periods in the area due to its position below sea level and subsequent result that UV rays are partially blocked by the increased cloud cover over the Dead Sea.

Rhinosinusitis patients receiving Dead Sea saline nasal irrigation exhibited improved symptom relief compared to standard hypertonic saline spray in one study.

Osteoarthritis Dead Sea mud pack therapy has been suggested to temporarily relieve pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knees. According to researchers of the Ben Gurion University of the Negev, treatment with mineral-rich mud compresses can be used to augment conventional medical therapy.

Since 1930, when its surface was 1,050 km (410 sq mi) and its level was 390 m (1,280 ft) below sea level, the Dead Sea has been monitored continuously. In recent decades, the Dead Sea has been rapidly shrinking because of diversion of incoming water from the Jordan River to the north.

The southern end is fed by a canal maintained by the Dead Sea Works, a company that converts the sea's raw materials. From a water surface of 395 m (1,296 ft) below sea level in 1970 it fell 22 m (72 ft) to 418 m (1,371 ft) below sea level in 2006, reaching a drop rate of 1 m (3 ft) per year. As the water level decreases, the characteristics of the Sea and surrounding region may substantially change.

The Dead Sea level drop has been followed by a groundwater level drop, causing brines that used to occupy underground layers near the shoreline to be flushed out by freshwater. This is believed to be the cause of the recent appearance of large sinkholes along the western shore incoming freshwater dissolves salt layers, rapidly creating subsurface cavities that subsequently collapse to form these sinkholes. In May 2009 at the World Economic Forum, Jordan announced its plans to construct the "Jordan National Red Sea Development Project" (JRSP). This is a plan to convey seawater from the Red Sea near Aqaba to the Dead Sea. Water would be desalinated along the route to provide fresh water to Jordan, with the brine discharge sent to the Dead Sea for replenishment.

The early planning called for developer and financier selection to be completed by year's end, with detailed design to begin in early 2010, and water delivery by 2017. Israel expressed its support and will likely benefit from some of the water delivery to its Negev region. Some hydro-power will be collected near the Dead Sea from the dramatic change in elevation on the downhill side of the project. At a regional conference in July 2009, officials expressed concern about the declining water levels.

Some suggested industrial activities around the Dead Sea might need to be reduced. Others advised environmental measures to restore conditions such as increasing the volume of flow from the Jordan River to replenish the Dead Sea. Currently, only sewage and effluent from fish ponds run in the river's channel. Experts also stressed the need for strict conservation efforts.

They said agriculture should not be expanded, sustainable support capabilities should be incorporated into the area and pollution sources should be reduced.

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